Super Blue Blood Moon: How a Full Moon Attracts Your Sleep, According to Researchers

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • The full moon has long been suspected to influence sleep cycles, among other human behavioural changes, but until recently this was unproven. While most previous research discovered some link between sleep and the moon cycles,  the most recent and conclusive study, the 2013 Cajochen study, found “full moons were associated with longer times to fall asleep, reduced sleep efficiency, and less overall sleep time.”

  • According to the study, sleep disruptions peaked at the full moon, with “melatonin levels dropping during the days surrounding the full moon and subjects reporting feeling less refreshed the next day,” and “overall sleep time dropping to their lowest levels – an average of 20 minutes less sleep – on nights with a full moon.”

This is how the moon affects your sleep

While the glowing orb in the night-sky won’t turn you into a werewolf, as it was once believed, it is capable of affecting your sleep. The full moon has long been suspected to influence sleep cycles, among other human behavioural changes, but until recently this was unproven.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about the new study findings that give researchers an idea of how moon cycles affect our sleep.

People Are Sleeping in 20-Minute Bursts To Boost Productivity. But Is It Safe?

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • About a third of Americans don’t get enough sleep. But there’s a small group of people actively trying to spend less time in bed, not more: polyphasic sleepers. Part productivity hack, part science experiment, polyphasic sleep is rumored to have fueled great minds, including those of Leonardo da Vinci and Nikola Tesla.

  • It’s true: Some people really can function well with less than the recommended eight hours of sleep per night, Avidan says, but they’re the exception to the rule. For most people, sleep deprivation—whether it’s from polyphasic sleep or other reasons—will just continue to pile up, eventually taking a toll on health.

People Are Sleeping in Short Bursts of Just 20 Minutes To Boost Productivity

What is polyphasic sleep, and is it safe? Learn about polyphasic sleep schedules and cycles, plus whether or not you should try it.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about Polyphasic Sleep and why practicing this could be detrimental to your health.

We’re Getting More Sleep. A Whole 18 Minutes. It’s Not Enough

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • Years of scolding from health experts about a good night’s rest may be breaking through. Americans are finally getting more sleep — about 18 minutes more per weeknight compared with 2003. It may not sound like much, but researchers say it’s a positive sign.

  • On average, Americans get more than eight hours of sleep on weeknights and more on weekends, according to the data. But sleep length varies widely. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, more than a third of adults get insufficient sleep, which it defines as less than seven hours.

We’re Getting More Sleep. A Whole 18 Minutes. It’s Not Enough.

To prevent those problems and ensure quality sleep, experts suggest limiting screen time before bed, creating a consistent routine, avoiding naps and maintaining a relaxing environment. “When you enter the bedroom, it should be a sign for your body that it’s time to go to bed,” Dr. Basner said.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how Americans are getting 18 minutes more sleep on the weekends compared to 2003, but it’s not enough.

Teenagers Need More Sleep. That Takes Good Policy as Well as Good Parenting

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • Despite considerable scientific evidence demonstrating that later school start times are associated with more sleep among adolescents, as well as improvements in well-being, public safety and academic performance, resistance to changing start times remains high.

  • During adolescence, the release of the hormone melatonin, which signals sleep onset, is shifted about two hours later than what we see in adults or younger children — effectively causing a biological predisposition towards later bed times and later wake-up times during the adolescent years. That’s why the AAP and other medical groups focused their start time recommendation on middle and high schools. It’s also why good parenting, without good policy, may not be enough.

Teen-agers need more sleep. That takes good policy as well as good parenting.

We need to overcome resistance to later school start times. More rest improves teens’ well-being, public safety and academic performance. As school districts across America plan their calendars for the next school year, many have been grappling with the critical question of what time the morning school bell should ring.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how policy and good parenting can give teenagers more sleep, that will increase both public safety and academic performance.

A Good Night’s Sleep Can Be a Key Feature in Your Dream Home

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • The home design world is starting to tune in, with developers and architects approaching a good night’s sleep as a challenge worth solving. It’s a nascent awareness that follows a shift across other industries, moving away from relentless technology and stress, toward a calmer way.

  • Between high-tech solutions, such as light bulbs that promote alertness in the day and rest at night, and more primal ones, such as moving the bedroom or sometimes the whole house away from busy streets and into nature, the various approaches to sleep-friendly housing say one thing: “A good night’s sleep is one of the greatest gifts we can give ourselves and our families.” —Rachel Gutter, chief product officer of the International Well Building Institute

A good night’s sleep can be a key feature in your dream home

Sending midnight emails from the comfort of bed used to be the ultimate status symbol. Now, science and society are tending to agree that it’s the ultimate drag. The home design world is starting to tune in, with developers and architects approaching a good night’s sleep as a challenge worth solving.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how the home design industry is beginning to focus on building homes that prioritize a good night’s sleep.

Bad Night’s Sleep ‘Leads to Poor Choices Throughout the Day’

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • Unhealthy food choices, rows with partners and short attention spans are among the most common knock-on effects of a bad night’s sleep, according to a study.

  • Incredibly, those polled have 90 “bad sleeps” every year on average – almost a quarter of our yearly slumber. As a direct result, 171 questionable decisions or lapses of judgement are made over the course of a typical 12-month period.

This is how a bad night’s sleep can ruin your day

Unhealthy food choices, rows with partners and short attention spans are among the most common knock-on effects of a bad night’s sleep, according to a study. Researchers polled 2,000 UK adults to explore the impact of a terrible night’s sleep – with other outcomes including feeling more emotional, clumsiness and oversleeping.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how a bad night’s sleep can lead to poor choices throughout the day.

Why Sleeping Will Help You Stick To Your Resolutions All Year Round

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • “If you don’t sleep, you will get a reduced level of leptin, which is the hormone that will tell you you are full; and you get an increased level of ghrelin, which tells you when you are hungry. So you are removing the ‘I am full’ signal and adding the ‘I am hungry’ signal. As a result, you don’t feel satisfied by food.” —Dave Gibson, sleep expert and co-author of “The Art of Falling Asleep”

  • “The main thing with sleep is regularity. It is not just about the quantity, but the fact that you go for it every day at the same time,” said Gibson. “You should be getting around seven and a half hours of sleep — it varies per person, but don’t ever dip below six.”

Why Sleeping Will Help You Stick To Your Resolutions All Year Round

Whether you’re pledging to get to the gym more or promising to drink less, the key to sticking to your goals this year is making sure you get enough sleep. It may sound counterproductive to hit the hay when you’re working toward new goals, but research has found that getting quality shut-eye can help you stick to your resolutions.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how getting quality sleep allows you to stick to your resolutions all year round.

Can’t Sleep? Younger Brains Need a Buffer Before Bedtime After Binge-Watching

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • Binge-watched shows on streaming services such as Netflix are often popular for that reason: Complex narrative, intense character development and emotional story lines running across multiple episodes. For teens and young adults, researchers now are linking such binge-watching to sleep issues because of cognitive alertness, meaning individuals keep thinking about a show or can’t “cool down” for slumber, a recent study says.
  • Binge-watchers had a 98 percent higher likelihood of having poor sleep quality, compared with respondents who didn’t consider themselves to be binge-watchers, researchers said. Devon Grant, a Spokane sleep researcher, wasn’t involved in the study but agrees that teens and young adults are more susceptible to experiencing trouble falling asleep after binge-watching an intense show. It’s something parents can help monitor.

Can’t sleep? Younger brains need a buffer before bedtime after binge-watching

Sun., Jan. 21, 2018, noon Seconds tick off to watch yet another TV episode, tempting viewers immersed in what happens next. Binge-watched shows on streaming services such as Netflix are often popular for that reason: Complex narrative, intense character development and emotional story lines running across multiple episodes.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read about how younger brains need a bugger before bedtime after binge-watching, to get better quality sleep.

This Common Sleep Habit Could Be Causing You Major Anxiety

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • Skimping on sleep can often lead to feeling groggy the next day, but it can also raise your risk of a more serious, long-term effect on your mental health, according to a new study. Researchers at Binghamton University found that sleeping less than eight hours a night was associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts, similar to those seen with anxiety disorder and depression.
  • When sleep is regularly disrupted, it can lead to a tendency toward getting negative thoughts “stuck” in the mind, says lead researcher Meredith Coles, a professor of psychology at Binghamton University.

This Common Sleep Habit Could Be Causing You Major Anxiety

Skimping on sleep can often lead to feeling groggy the next day, but it can also raise your risk of a more serious, long-term effect on your mental health, according to a new study. Researchers at Binghamton University found that sleeping less than eight hours a night was associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts, similar to those seen with anxiety disorder and depression.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read and learn about the link between sleep deprivation and depression, and how to get consistent restful sleep to combat the issue.

Sugar And Sleep: More Rest May Dull Your Sweet Tooth

InstaSleep Reviews Team article notes:

  • In one study, participants who routinely got less than seven hours of sleep were coached to extend their sleep time. They also changed their diets, without being asked — taking in less sugar each day.
  • “We found that those who extended their sleep [also] reduced their intake of added sugars by about 10 grams per day,” explains one of the study authors, Haya Al Khatib, a doctoral candidate at King’s College London.

Sugar And Sleep: More Rest May Dull Your Sweet Tooth

Listen up, night owls: If you’re sleeping six or fewer hours per night, you’re not doing your health any favors. A new study finds that getting the recommended seven to nine hours of sleep per night may help you tame your sweet tooth.

This article was selected by the InstaSleep Reviews Team. Please enjoy this read and learn how getting rest and good quality sleep can curb your sugar cravings.